Developing A Multicultural Facebook Branding Strategy

Marketers struggle to find the best ways to use social media as a branding tool. With social media use rising among all demographics, shifting brand campaigning to these platforms is increasingly important, especially for marketers targeting a Hispanic audience who average 4.0 hours per week on social networks. Non-Hispanics fall below them at 3.7 hours per week.1 Though Hispanics spend more time on social media sites, Hispanics surf the web almost three hours per week less than non-Hispanics.1 This means that proportionally, social media is far more impactful to Hispanics than non-Hispanics, making these platforms essential marketing tools for this audience. Hispanics are most drawn to Facebook: 60.7 percent log in at least once per day and 73 percent log in at least once per week.2 No other social media network comes close to such high Hispanic usage percentages. Marketers must realize that social media is the future of marketing to Hispanics, and brands will have the best chance of reaching Hispanics through Facebook (see charts below). Many brands have attempted the social media transition, but few have optimized success. A fine line separates marketers from using social media “the right way” and “the wrong way”. Marketers have many factors to consider when starting a social media campaign aimed at this fluid market. If successful, marketers will reap the rewards of $1.5 trillion in Hispanic buying power projected within the next five years.3 In this four-part blog series, we will outline the eight steps to successfully integrating a Hispanics branding campaign into Facebook. Part One of Four: Developing a Multicultural Facebook Branding Strategy 1.  Define and research your audience. Define your target audience for your product and identify the products and services that your Hispanic market segment needs or wants. Note: simply identifying a target group as “U.S. Hispanics” is too broad and leaves a large margin for error. Successful Facebook pages are geared toward a smaller, more specific audience.4 As the U.S.’s largest minority segment, Hispanics share many similarities but they are also...

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Highlighting Hispanic Holiday Shoppers

This week, American consumers won’t just be loosening their belts after Thanksgiving dinner, they’ll be loosening their purse strings. Retailers continue to maximize Holiday spending—with many opening their doors on Thanksgiving night. Sears and Walmart will begin Black Friday door buster deals beginning at 8:00 p.m. (with additional deals at midnight) while Target and Toys “R” US open their doors at 9:00 p.m. As the general market looks to get the best possible deals on this competitive shopping occasion, Hispanic shoppers are looking for the most satisfying (verse cheapest) purchases. Hispanic shoppers are making investments and spending money during the Holiday season, even if they have to spend a little more to get the quality item on their lists. While Hispanics embrace Black Friday in-store shopping, the Internet will be a key point of purchase for many Hispanic shoppers this season. Compared to the general market, Hispanics over index on online electronics, apparel, shoes and appliance purchases and are predicted to spend $6.5 billion on online purchases alone. This holiday seasons, marketers shouldn’t just stress their deals, but they should highlight their brand’s quality to gain the Hispanic consumer’s attention and business. “Hispanics aren’t focusing on cheap deals during the Holidays,” said George L. San Jose, president and chief creative officer of The San Jose Group. “They’re buying gifts their loved ones will actually enjoy. So while other shopper’s might be fighting over the $12.00 fleece throw blankets for their relatives, you might find Hispanic shoppers making bigger purchases on items their friends and family will truly value… it’s about the heart.” Sources: “Study Show Hispanic Shoppers Behavior Shifts by Season Unlike General Market Shoppers.” (September 13, 2012). PR Newswire. Date retrieved November 19, 2012. http://www.prnewswire.com/ news-releases/study-shows-hispanic-shoppers-behavior-shifts-by-season-unlike-general-market-shoppers-102781869.html “Hispanic Online Shopping is Up for Grabs this Holiday Season.” (November 7, 2012). Hispanic Online Marketing. Date retrieved November 19, 2012. http://www.hispaniconlinemarketing.com/2012/11/...

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America, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?

By Cassandra Bremer, content developer at The San Jose Group America, guess who’s coming to dinner? Hispanics! The beautiful thing about food is people have got to eat—surviving without it is an impossibility. But for the Hispanic population, food, or meals rather, are times to bring the family together and celebrate traditions. Over 5 nights a week, Hispanics are eating home cooked dinners—and those dinners might not be the stereotypical Spanish foods like tacos, burritos, rice and beans; Hispanics, depending on their level of acculturation, tend to adapt to an American diet.1 Yup, Hispanics are leaving those taco shells on the shelves and are firing up the grill. Acculturated Hispanics are only eating ethnic twice a week, leaving at least five nights of non-Hispanic dinning a week. As with any immigrating culture, Hispanics are undergoing lifestyle changes including acculturating and assimilating into the American culture. According to diet.com, the modern U.S. Hispanic diet consists of meals influenced by their traditional country of origin as well as ones from the United States.2  Therefore, the higher the acculturation level, the lower the consumption of authentic Hispanic foods. The American supermarket can be described in one word: options—people can buy almost any kind of food; the more people shop at supermarkets, the bigger their opportunities to branch out to other foods. A majority of Hispanics purchase their groceries at supermarkets in addition to butcher shops, bakeries, bodegas, convenience stores, drug stores, specialty shops and warehouse stores.1 Hispanics also prefer to buy in bulk vs. buying prepackage. Hispanics don’t cut out the middleman in food; in addition to buying and eating, preparing food is a central part of the Hispanic diet because they believe a home prepared meal has more nutritional value than prepackaged meals.  In fact, Hispanics spend almost 50% more dollars per year on produce compared to the American average. Such produce includes authentic Hispanic fruits and vegetables like avocado, plantain, mango, squash, bananas, beans and corn. “In the US, Hispanic families are now exposed to a...

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Campaigning for the Latino Vote

What’s the best demographic investment your organization could make? Today, more than ever, party campaign strategists believe the answer to successful campaigning lies in America’s fastest-growing population group: Latino Americans. For the first time in American history, this year both Republican and Democratic parties selected Latinos to speak in the prime time slot of their party’s respective national conventions. “We need the Hispanic vote and want to win it,” says the 2012 Presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s youngest son, Craig Romney. The Romney campaign releasing Spanish advertisements as well as the party’s $3 million investment in finding and financing at least 100 new Latino legislative candidates lends evidence to support the Republican Party’s professed desire to attract Latino favor. This project is being sponsored by the Republican State Leadership Committee and is known as the Future Majority Project, which is appropriately named in recognition of 2010 U.S. Census results showing Hispanics to represent more than half of all U.S. population growth over the past decade and representing America’s fastest-growing population group. If that were not evidence enough that the Republican Party is making a concerted effort, Republicans selected Florida Senator Marco Rubio to speak at the primetime slot of the party’s national convention. Rubio related the story of his Cuban parents who immigrated to the U.S. The Republican Party is not alone in investing money and engagement into a Latino future. The Democratic Party recently featured charismatic San Antonio, Texas Mayor Julian Castro in the primetime slot at their party’s national convention. More than that, between mid-April and June, the Obama campaign spent $1.7 million on advertising directed at Spanish-speaking Hispanics, according to SMG-Delta, a media firm that tracks campaign advertising. “Every purchase a Latino makes is a ‘vote’ for a brand,” said George L. San Jose, president and chief creative officer at The San Jose Group. “The Hispanic vote is just as important to the candidates as it is to brands. Campaigning leads to increased spending and ultimately ROI.” In 2012, the candidates have...

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#5- Do you speak my language?

We continue our blog on 5 Reasons for Higher Ad Recall Among Hispanics. What do Budweiser, Bounty and McDonald’s have in common? They have all successfully reached the Hispanic market with Spanish language print, radio and television ads. Spanish primetime advertisement spots reach over half the Hispanic population ages 18-49, while English ads only reach 40%.1 Deciding to advertise in a particular language involves more than simply translating copy. When done right, Spanish language ads produce 30% higher recall among Hispanics. Why? 5. Originality What happens if you are Hispanic and the only ads you see are of a picturesque Latino family coming together to share a meal? Ads lose their effect. While marketers and advertisers want to reach their targets by sparking a cultural connection, the name of the marketing game is still creativity. In language ads lacking creativity will not warrant effective results for marketers; however, originality operates as a great hook. In 2010, Bounty released a radio ad in Spanish entitled “Batalla” (Battle). The spot proved particularly creative as the battle was really a food fight (or a food war) in which only Bounty could win. Instead of the sound of marching, the words “flan, flan, flan” are spoken in a tone mimicking the sounds of a war march, in place of a bomb, the word “Pizza,” with an elongated “i” was spoken to imitate bombs, and replacing the sound of helicopters, the word “taco” was spoken in stagnated form simulating the sound of a chopper. While food fights might be hard to imagine with just sound, the Bounty ad creatively produced a strong vision of a food fight using only language. This award winning ad shows incorporating language with originality will make for effective advertising. Sources: 1. “Hispanics View TV in Language Used at Home.” (2011, Apr. 20). Marketing Charts. Retrieved from http://www.marketingcharts.com/television/hispanics-view-tv-in-language-used-at-home-17130/ 5. Wentz, Laurel. (2010, Oct. 9). “Hispanic Creative Advertising Awards 2010 Best of Show: Bounty’s ‘Batalla’. Advertising Age. Retrieved from http://adage.com/article/special-report-hispanic-creative-advertising-awards-2010/hispanic-creative-ad-awards-2010-show-bounty/146373/...

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#4- Do you speak my language?

We continue our blog on Five Reasons for Higher Ad Recall Among Hispanics. What do Budweiser, Bounty and McDonald’s have in common? They have all successfully reached the Hispanic market with Spanish language print, radio and television ads. Spanish primetime advertisement spots reach over half the Hispanic population ages 18-49, while English ads only reach 40%.1 Deciding to advertise in a particular language involves more than simply translating copy. When done right, Spanish language ads produce 30% higher recall among Hispanics. Why? 4. Language says something about your brand and its personality What says more about your brand than the language you are using to communicate your message? When advertising to the multicultural or bilingual population, don’t just pick a language. For instance, for commercials running in the states, do not just put the language in English so that the spot is relevant to the general market as well. If you are targeting the Hispanic market, then aim for them—but keep in mind, the Hispanic market, although a minority market, stands as the largest minority market in the United States; they have different levels of acculturation, and with more acculturation comes a higher response from English language ads. So, when picking language, decide if you want to target the acculturated or unacculturated Hispanic market. From there, advertisers can naturally make language choices. When the McDonald’s “She is Mine” commercial originally aired in the United States, the quick service restaurant corporation aimed at acculturated Hispanics with cross-over appeal to the general market. Della De Lafuente writes in Ad Week that the actress was a Latina, the music used was “vaguely Latin and all the characters [were] dark-haired[.] The setting could be any global city and the character a range of ethnicities.”4 Therefore, despite the use of English in the ad, when speaking to acculturated Hispanics, the commercial successfully resonated with the Hispanic target. Because the ad was culturally relevant (incorporating one of the four F’s), the ad was eventually transculturated into Spanish and used in Latin...

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