Exchanges Enrollment Implementation at the Consumer Level

By Martha C. Rivera, Director of Strategy and Insights Consumer education should be at the core of any efforts to implement the ACA. As the deadline for enrollment through health insurance market places approaches and the government and health insurance organizations rush out to be up and running within the Exchanges by October 1, all of them at the local and national level should be developing strong consumer education strategic platforms as well. Otherwise, how can they drive the uninsured for enrollment starting in January 1, 2014, when more than 78% of the people who would be eligible for enrollment through the Exchanges have never heard of them? “Creating awareness of the ACA’s key components and milestones, providing plain-language, culturally-sensitive understanding of the Exchanges at a general level and generating consumer intention to learn more about what can be in the ACA for them are three key objectives that Exchange-related education should accomplish in the immediate term,” said George L. San Jose, president and chief creative officer at The San Jose Group. A recent study sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, revealed that, after being provided with general information on the matter, about 73% of people who would be eligible for enrollment through Exchanges would be interested in doing so, while 55% use the internet on a daily basis and 79% would confide on their internet-related skills for that. Source: http://www.rwjf.org/content/dam/farm/reports/surveys_and_polls/2012/rwjf73113...

read more

Five Ways Increasing Multicultural Enrollment Helps the Economy

By Cassandra Bremer, Content Manager and Developer and Troy Pritchard, Junior Executive- San Jose Group College campuses around the country often house the most multicultural and diverse communities in the U.S. As summer comes to a close, colleges nationwide have begun welcoming students back to campuses for the fall semester, now more diverse than ever as multicultural enrollment continues to steadily increase. During the 1980s, when marketers first realized the emerging multicultural market, Latino education grew by 60.7% according to Manuel Zamarripa’s “Education.” Last year, Hispanic high school graduate’s fall semester college enrollment was a record-high 69%, while non-Hispanic whites’ enrollment dropped to 67%, reports a 2012 Pew Research Center analysis. As young multicultural adults plan to earn college degrees, their lives as well as the economy will see vast improvements. Here are five ways increasing multicultural enrollment can help the economy. 1. Increased spending power Americans with bachelor’s degrees make 84% more over a lifetime than high school graduates, reports a recent Georgetown University study. On average, a college graduate will earn $2.3 million over a lifetime compared to high school graduate’s $1.3 million. Multicultural college enrollment means higher earning potential, making them powerful consumer markets. Some companies have already started marketing towards different multicultural markets in pursuit of their increasing spending power (Hispanics will have a $1.5 trillion spending power by 2015). 2. Dynamic consumers Healthy economies depend on active consumers. Educated consumer bases not increase the per capita earning, but consumers begin to spend their money in different sectors of the GDP including housing, insurance, automotive, retail, education and entertainment. As multicultural dollars stimulate different sectors of the GDP with their increasing spending power, the economy strengthens. 3. Increased need for technological devices The Unite States, home of “the largest and most technologically powerful economy in the world” according to the CIA’s World Fact Book, depends on the technology industry to help drive a strong economy. In 2008, the information and communication technology expenditure in the U.S. accounted for 7.36% of...

read more

Comparing State-Run and Federal-Run Exchanges

By Martha C. Rivera, Director of Strategy and Insights with the support of Nicha Ruchirawat, Junior Executive As the deadline for implementing health insurance exchanges approaches, nearly half the states in the Union have declared to participate in federal-run exchanges (FFE), while the remaining will establish state-run exchanges either independently or in partnership with the federal government. Three key differences between state-run and federal-run exchanges that may have a significant impact on the multicultural population are: 1. FFEs make it easier for lower-income people with income fluctuations over the course of the year to oscillate between Medicaid/CHIP coverage and private individual insurance by requiring that plans from these programs offer similar benefits and provider networks. 2. In those states where the local government resisted Medicaid expansion, FFEs will allow eligible individuals to purchase insurance coverage through the exchange with federal subsidies. 3. As states determine their own key regulations, the federal government needs to know each state’s unique laws and policies to run the FFE and to select qualified health plans that may participate. This makes it harder for FFEs to provide consumer assistance because this requires more effort and resources in order to produce knowledgeable navigators to support the local exchanges, which depends on availability of training grant funds. “Over 10 million people from the multicultural segment will be eligible for individual insurance through the Health Exchanges,” said George L. San Jose, president and chief creative officer at The San Jose Group. “This makes it essential to realize that enrollees of multicultural origin will be a huge part of participants in either FFE or State-Exchanges, as well as beneficiaries from Medicaid...

read more

Federal Health Exchange for ACA Reluctant States and the Multicultural Population

By Martha C. Rivera, Director of Strategy and Insights Perhaps not many people in the country have had the opportunity or the interest to recognize that, for the good and for the bad, the Obamacare reform implicates a structural, break-through change in the country’s health system. Additionally, as the implementation of the reform is on its way despite the many controversies and reluctances, our country is developing a health care model that has no known precedent in the world. In fact, America is pioneering a new health system, and being a pioneer is always difficult. As challenges to the ACA emerge, so do solutions including the Federally Facilitated Exchange (FFE). Basically, FFE is a health-insurance marketplace established by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, where uninsured people living in states that will not set up their own Exchange can buy their individual insurance policies within the same concept of the state-established exchanges. General ACA regulations will apply to the FFE; although they will in proper alignment with specific state laws. Multicultural population coverage within the FFE will likely be significant. Currently, several of the 25 states that are not going to establish a Health Insurance Exchange and would consequently participate in the FEE are also some of the states with greater multicultural populations, particularly of Hispanic origin, including Texas and Florida. “At least 42% of the Health Exchanges enrollees will be multicultural,” said George L. San Jose, president and chief creative officer at The San Jose Group. “The FEE, as much as the state Exchanges should address the specific needs of these multicultural consumers, including in-language information, culturally appropriate navigator systems and supporting tools and materials for the appropriate health-literacy levels.” Source: How will Health Insurance Exchanges Reach Our Nation’s Racially and Ethnically Diverse Communities? Texas health Institute, Policy Brief No.1, May...

read more