Affordable Care Act (Healthcare Reform) and Multicultural Populations cont.

Jan 22, 13 Affordable Care Act (Healthcare Reform) and Multicultural Populations cont.

Posted by in Healthcare, Insurance

We continue our 12 part blog series on the Affordable Care Act and Multicultural Populations.   How to qualify for the Tax Credit – Part 9 By Martha C. Rivera, Director, Strategy and Insights, and Alejandro Ramos-Martinez, Junior Executive To qualify for the tax credit, small businesses must cover at least 50 percent of each employee’s health insurance premiums. Small businesses that employ part-time workers are also eligible for help, and their credits are calculated by determining the number of “full-time equivalents” that they employ. For example, two half-time workers count as one full-time worker for the purpose of calculating tax credit eligibility. In addition, small businesses are eligible for the tax credit even if they already receive assistance from their state to help them buy coverage for their workers, and they can continue to deduct the remainder of their health care costs when they file their federal income taxes. In 2014, once the state health insurance Exchanges are up and running, small businesses will be eligible for tax credits of up to 50 percent of the cost of covering their workers through the Exchanges (or a 25 percent refund for nonprofits). Look for Part 10 of our Affordable Care Act and Multicultural Populations in a future blog. Source:...

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Developing A Multicultural Facebook Branding Strategy

Marketers struggle to find the best ways to use social media as a branding tool. With social media use rising among all demographics, shifting brand campaigning to these platforms is increasingly important, especially for marketers targeting a Hispanic audience who average 4.0 hours per week on social networks. Non-Hispanics fall below them at 3.7 hours per week.1 Though Hispanics spend more time on social media sites, Hispanics surf the web almost three hours per week less than non-Hispanics.1 This means that proportionally, social media is far more impactful to Hispanics than non-Hispanics, making these platforms essential marketing tools for this audience. Hispanics are most drawn to Facebook: 60.7 percent log in at least once per day and 73 percent log in at least once per week.2 No other social media network comes close to such high Hispanic usage percentages. Marketers must realize that social media is the future of marketing to Hispanics, and brands will have the best chance of reaching Hispanics through Facebook (see charts below). Many brands have attempted the social media transition, but few have optimized success. A fine line separates marketers from using social media “the right way” and “the wrong way”. Marketers have many factors to consider when starting a social media campaign aimed at this fluid market. If successful, marketers will reap the rewards of $1.5 trillion in Hispanic buying power projected within the next five years.3 In this four-part blog series, we will outline the eight steps to successfully integrating a Hispanics branding campaign into Facebook. Part One of Four: Developing a Multicultural Facebook Branding Strategy 1.  Define and research your audience. Define your target audience for your product and identify the products and services that your Hispanic market segment needs or wants. Note: simply identifying a target group as “U.S. Hispanics” is too broad and leaves a large margin for error. Successful Facebook pages are geared toward a smaller, more specific audience.4 As the U.S.’s largest minority segment, Hispanics share many similarities but they are also...

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Affordable Care Act (Healthcare Reform) and Multicultural Populations cont.

Jan 03, 13 Affordable Care Act (Healthcare Reform) and Multicultural Populations cont.

Posted by in Healthcare

We continue our 12 part blog series on the Affordable Care Act and Multicultural Populations.   How the New Small Business Health Care Tax Credit Works – Part 8 By Martha C. Rivera, Director, Strategy and Insights, and Alejandro Ramos-Martinez, Junior Executive Under the Affordable Care Act, many small employers are now eligible to receive a tax credit to pay for up to 35 percent of the average cost of a small group health insurance plan in their state (or a 25 percent refund for nonprofits). Congress designed this credit with the intent of providing the greatest help to those businesses and workers who are most in need—the smallest employers who face the highest premiums and are the least able to offer coverage to their workers. As such, small businesses with fewer than 50 workers (or the equivalent) and average wages of less than $50,000 are now eligible to receive a credit, but the smallest firms with the lowest wages—those that employ 10 or fewer workers who earn an average wage of less than $25,000—are eligible for the greatest help and receive the full 35 percent tax credit (or a 25 percent refund for nonprofits). From there, the size of the credit phases out on a sliding scale. Look for Part 9 of our Affordable Care Act and Multicultural Populations in a future blog. Source: http://www.irs.gov/uac/Small-Business-Health-Care-Tax-Credit-for-Small-Employers...

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