#5- Do you speak my language?

We continue our blog on 5 Reasons for Higher Ad Recall Among Hispanics. What do Budweiser, Bounty and McDonald’s have in common? They have all successfully reached the Hispanic market with Spanish language print, radio and television ads. Spanish primetime advertisement spots reach over half the Hispanic population ages 18-49, while English ads only reach 40%.1 Deciding to advertise in a particular language involves more than simply translating copy. When done right, Spanish language ads produce 30% higher recall among Hispanics. Why? 5. Originality What happens if you are Hispanic and the only ads you see are of a picturesque Latino family coming together to share a meal? Ads lose their effect. While marketers and advertisers want to reach their targets by sparking a cultural connection, the name of the marketing game is still creativity. In language ads lacking creativity will not warrant effective results for marketers; however, originality operates as a great hook. In 2010, Bounty released a radio ad in Spanish entitled “Batalla” (Battle). The spot proved particularly creative as the battle was really a food fight (or a food war) in which only Bounty could win. Instead of the sound of marching, the words “flan, flan, flan” are spoken in a tone mimicking the sounds of a war march, in place of a bomb, the word “Pizza,” with an elongated “i” was spoken to imitate bombs, and replacing the sound of helicopters, the word “taco” was spoken in stagnated form simulating the sound of a chopper. While food fights might be hard to imagine with just sound, the Bounty ad creatively produced a strong vision of a food fight using only language. This award winning ad shows incorporating language with originality will make for effective advertising. Sources: 1. “Hispanics View TV in Language Used at Home.” (2011, Apr. 20). Marketing Charts. Retrieved from http://www.marketingcharts.com/television/hispanics-view-tv-in-language-used-at-home-17130/ 5. Wentz, Laurel. (2010, Oct. 9). “Hispanic Creative Advertising Awards 2010 Best of Show: Bounty’s ‘Batalla’. Advertising Age. Retrieved from http://adage.com/article/special-report-hispanic-creative-advertising-awards-2010/hispanic-creative-ad-awards-2010-show-bounty/146373/...

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#4- Do you speak my language?

We continue our blog on Five Reasons for Higher Ad Recall Among Hispanics. What do Budweiser, Bounty and McDonald’s have in common? They have all successfully reached the Hispanic market with Spanish language print, radio and television ads. Spanish primetime advertisement spots reach over half the Hispanic population ages 18-49, while English ads only reach 40%.1 Deciding to advertise in a particular language involves more than simply translating copy. When done right, Spanish language ads produce 30% higher recall among Hispanics. Why? 4. Language says something about your brand and its personality What says more about your brand than the language you are using to communicate your message? When advertising to the multicultural or bilingual population, don’t just pick a language. For instance, for commercials running in the states, do not just put the language in English so that the spot is relevant to the general market as well. If you are targeting the Hispanic market, then aim for them—but keep in mind, the Hispanic market, although a minority market, stands as the largest minority market in the United States; they have different levels of acculturation, and with more acculturation comes a higher response from English language ads. So, when picking language, decide if you want to target the acculturated or unacculturated Hispanic market. From there, advertisers can naturally make language choices. When the McDonald’s “She is Mine” commercial originally aired in the United States, the quick service restaurant corporation aimed at acculturated Hispanics with cross-over appeal to the general market. Della De Lafuente writes in Ad Week that the actress was a Latina, the music used was “vaguely Latin and all the characters [were] dark-haired[.] The setting could be any global city and the character a range of ethnicities.”4 Therefore, despite the use of English in the ad, when speaking to acculturated Hispanics, the commercial successfully resonated with the Hispanic target. Because the ad was culturally relevant (incorporating one of the four F’s), the ad was eventually transculturated into Spanish and used in Latin...

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Apples and Androids and Apps, Oh My!

Last month, Apple released the iPhone 5, selling five million units in the first weekend; however, after five years of smartphone supremacy, is the iPhone losing its edge to Android?1 Apple’s new release came up one million units short of projected sales, and even though the iOS still exists as the top platform used by app developers, whether or not they’ll maintain their dominance is in question.2 According to a recent GigaOM Pro Survey, (in which 352 app developers completed web-based questioners), app developers are forecasted to begin using the Android platform at a faster rate than iOS.2 So the question for marketers remains: Apple or Android? (And of course the follow up) Mobile or Tablet? Or, is pricey app development even necessary if the company constructs an efficient website compatible for mobiles and tablets? The answer: let the target consumers tell marketers what platforms they prefer. In this modern marketing age, marketers have to be attuned to what the consumer base wants, how and where they want to hear about it. Investing in apps might not be the best option if that’s not how consumers want to communicate with the brand; on the other hand, if consumers want quick and easy access—app development might be the way to go. Be mindful, general market preferences differ from Hispanic consumer preferences. And with more Hispanics using mobile platforms to access the Internet, marketers must take their preferences into consideration before marketing to them. In any case, marketers must keep up with the continuous Apple/Android battle, and ensure—no matter what platform they choose—they maintain an integrated marketing approach. Apps and websites are branding tools, as well as sales tools—marketers cannot afford to alienate their consumers with complicated or subpar applications and websites. “We have so many resources to communicate with our consumers, more than ever before, but we can lose them quickly if we don’t truly have an integrated marketing approach,” said George L. San Jose, president and chief creative officer at The San Jose Group....

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Google+ Hispanics: How to Increase SEO with Social Media – Part 5

We conclude our blog on Five Ways to Increase SEO with Social Media. Hispanics over indexing on social media could mean better ranking on Google search engines. Earlier this year, Google released two new algorithms: Panda and Penguin. While the names might sound cute, companies won’t think so once their rankings on search engines lower. Social media platforms are now married to SEO—they’re no longer just initiating engagement, awareness and keeping brands top-of-mind, but they’re also keeping brands top-of-Google. Since maintaining and increasing ranking lies in the hands of social media users, companies must connect with consumers on the Internet. According to a 2012 American Pulse Survey, 80 percent of Hispanics are active on Facebook, 60.4 percent are on Twitter (over 20 percent higher than the general market), and 54.4 percent are on Google+ (15 percent higher than the general market).1 And with Hispanics spending over 20 hours a week on social media, companies who can channel their engagement are sure to see SEO impacts.2 How to engage Hispanics via social media: 5. Create Groups, Contests and Sweepstakes Give consumers something to get hyped about. It’s not enough to create a couple of social media pages to draw in consumers; companies have to motivate them. Broadcasting contests, sweepstakes and giveaways provide the perfect incentive for people to like brands. What’s in it for brands? Among the given social media benefits – such as generating impressions, building awareness and loyalty—stands increasing SEO. “Think of social media as a living being—it should have personality and culture,” says George L. San Jose, president and chief creative officer of The San Jose Group. “But it can’t just look cool, it has to be functional and engaging. Use social media to communicate and interact with consumers and you’ll find your brand growing.” By investing appropriately in social media, and with the help of engaged Hispanic consumers, brands will not only increase their SEO, but will surely maximize their ROI. Sources: 1. BIGinsight. (2012, Feb.) “Hispanics Log in to Social Media...

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Google+ Hispanics: How to Increase SEO with Social Media – Part 4

We continue our blog on Five Ways to Increase SEO with Social Media. Hispanics over indexing on social media could mean better ranking on Google search engines. Earlier this year, Google released two new algorithms: Panda and Penguin. While the names might sound cute, companies won’t think so once their rankings on search engines lower. Social media platforms are now married to SEO—they’re no longer just initiating engagement, awareness and keeping brands top-of-mind, but they’re also keeping brands top-of-Google. Since maintaining and increasing ranking lies in the hands of social media users, companies must connect with consumers on the Internet. According to a 2012 American Pulse Survey, 80 percent of Hispanics are active on Facebook, 60.4 percent are on Twitter (over 20 percent higher than the general market), and 54.4 percent are on Google+ (15 percent higher than the general market).1 And with Hispanics spending over 20 hours a week on social media, companies who can channel their engagement are sure to see SEO impacts.2 How to engage Hispanics via social media: 4. Implement an Integrated Mobile Marketing Platform A company’s social media platform, messaging and content should match the look and feel of its other marketing tools such as its website, and offline media advertisements. Since, Hispanics tend to access social media from their mobiles, making websites mobile friendly is imperative to Hispanic engagement. Consider this scenario: a Hispanic consumer connects to a company’s website through the link on its mobile Facebook page; however, since the website is not mobile friendly, the consumer gets frustrated and doesn’t trust the product —they will unlike, unfollow or -1 (which does not help the SEO ranking) and the company runs the risk of the consumer spreading the experience, word-of-mouth. But, when consumers undergo seamless experiences with brands’ mobile sites, they are more likely to build social media relationships with those brands. Look for Part #5 on Five Ways to Increase SEO with Social Media in a future blog. Sources: 1. BIGinsight. (2012, Feb.) “Hispanics Log in to Social...

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