Do Hispanics Keep up with the Jones’? Part 3

We continue our blog on Do Hispanics Keep up with the Jones’? Make Your Ad a Melting Pot What is “American” and how is our melting pot changing? Music Interests Hip-Hop, Rap, R&B, Rock and Country all make up hits in the top forties, but the music industry is constantly changing and they’re always looking for new influences and techniques for making music. While American’s might not be listening to Salsa, main stream music artists are using Salsa and Latin musical influence in several hit songs ranging from Pop and Hip-hop to Rap and Rock. Artists like Ricky Martin, Shakira, Enrique Iglesias, Pitbull and Carlos Santana have all helped introduce and hook the American mainstream on music with Latin influence. TV Sitcoms, talk shows, reality television, games shows and soaps dominate the main stream broadcasting networks. Hispanics, not only have a presence on Hispanic networks, but television actors such as  George Lopez, America Ferrera and Selena Gomez have ­­­stared in shows centered around Hispanics/American characters with American style comedy and themes. Food Hamburgers, Cheeseburgers, freedom fries (are we still calling it that?), onion rings, pie, doughnuts, candy— basically if it’s full of deep fried, greasy goodness, it’s an American food. Cheese burgers and apple-pie are the great Americans options, but the addition of quick service restaurants like Qdoba and Chipotle (Taco Bell isn’t our only option for a taco or burrito) broaden the American food menu options. Even the addition of breakfast burritos and wraps to the McDonald’s menu shows Hispanics have influenced the American diet. Holidays Independence Day, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day—our holidays tend to reflect our History, while other countries might have holidays focused on religions. How have Hispanic’s influenced Holidays? In addition to the much celebrated Cinco de Mayo, Hispanics have also generated recognition for other Hispanic Holidays such as Puerto Rican Independence Day, Mexican Independence Day, Spanish Heritage Month and Day of the Dead. America will always be the land of the free and home of...

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Do Hispanics Keep up with the Jones’? Part 2

We continue our blog on Do Hispanics Keep up with the Jones’? Make Your Ad a Melting Pot What is “American” and how is our melting pot changing? Values Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness—our forefathers did a fairly good job at setting Americans up with an opportunity for all to achieve the rights to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness no matter who they are or where they’ve come from. Obviously we’ve had some amendments so the “all” really means “all.” While the inalienable rights are important to Hispanics, they value family over money, education and social status. Fashion Hipster, prep, goth, emo, jock, business, casual—so much of a person is defined simply from the way they present their exterior. Based on clothing, people might infer age, ethnicity, and certainly gender, but also they may gather interests, hobbies, social status, and even marital status. Techno Gadgets Smartphone, tablet, laptop, desktop, flat screen, ereader, MP3, Stero, Blu-Ray—we like our new, shiny, high powered gadgets that make us feel like we live in the futuristic world of Back to the Future. American’s keeping up with the Jones’ mentality has people camping out of Best Buy’s, Wal-Mart’s and other stores waiting for the doors to open so they can be among the first to dish out hundreds of dollars on the newest phone, game systems and tablets. Hispanics actually lead the market in moving mobile, so the real question is who’s influencing whom to buy the latest technologies. Exercising Rights What’s more American than voting, protesting and practicing free speech? It’s enough to say you’re an American, but another thing to practice it. Hispanics, with their own experiences and beliefs, have pushed for certain legislation, and their vote is predicted to carry an enormous influence in the upcoming presidential election—Both President Obama and Governor Romney are vying for their votes. Stay tuned for Do Hispanics Keep up with the Jones’? Make Your Ad a Melting Pot #3 in a future blog. Sources: 1....

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Do Hispanics Keep up with the Jones’? Part 1

We begin our blog on Do Hispanics Keep up with the Jones’? Make Your Ad a Melting Pot One aspect of human nature that we can’t ignore is our ability to adapt, or rather our instincts to “fit in.” Whether you’re a thirteen year old girl who’s listening to Justin Bieber because all your friends like JB, or a thirty-three year old man setting up the new flat screen because your buddies are coming over for the game (they already hassle you about your mini-van, don’t let them insult your tube), you conform to your peer expectations. While most of us have our individual interests, we also tend to have likes and interests that reflect the masses’. But what does this mean for Hispanics who’ve immigrated to the US? As it turns out, Hispanics don’t avoid American conformation or acculturation; however, acculturation is a process that may take generations. A majority of third generation Hispanics or later describe themselves as “American”1. However, like most immigrants, first generation and second generation Hispanics identify themselves by their country of origin; only 24% of this group use “American” to describe themselves.1 The Hispanic/American identity poses challenges for marketers because the culture becomes layered (see chart).2  We have completely unacculturated Hispanics, who may only speak Spanish and live in Hispanic communities. Then we have Hispanics who are somewhat acculturated, speaking both English and Spanish, consuming some mainstream brands, fashions and products, but still identifying heavily with their Hispanic/Latino roots. Then we have Hispanics who have acculturated completely to the American culture, identifying themselves as an American. Once Hispanics inherit an American identity, they still pose challenges for marketers. Even though they are adapting to American life, young acculturated Hispanics won’t always act or think like the American main stream.1 However, they also won’t resonate with ads that are aimed at unacculturated Hispanics. So what are marketers to do? Present them with advertisements that “speak to their roots in a meaningful and relevant way”1 while simultaneously exposing them to...

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#3- Do you speak my language?

We continue our blog on Five Reasons for Higher Ad Recall Among Hispanics. What do Budweiser, Bounty and McDonald’s have in common? They have all successfully reached the Hispanic market with Spanish language print, radio and television ads. Spanish primetime advertisement spots reach over half the Hispanic population ages 18-49, while English ads only reach 40%.1 Deciding to advertise in a particular language involves more than simply translating copy. When done right, Spanish language ads produce 30% higher recall among Hispanics. Why? 3. Authenticity vs. stereotyping Have you ever had anybody try to tell you what you believe? The gesture is quite obnoxious and annoying, especially when they are 100% wrong. The same thing holds true to the early days of Hispanic advertisements when advertisers’ only idea to get the market’s attention involved mariachi bands. Marketers were basically saying, “hey you, you’re Hispanic; you must love mariachi bands and will, therefore, love my commercial if I feature a mariachi band and buy my product.” Moving beyond the stereotypes and authentically portraying a culture only increases ad recall. Effective advertising stems from understanding your market’s interests (and language) and appropriately tying them in with your brand. For example, MillerCoors and Lopez Negrete have teamed up and produced several successful TV commercials for Miller Lite beer. The ads often surround the social interaction of futbol/soccer matches or interactions between couples—sorry, no mariachi bands here.4 Stay tuned for Higher Ad Recall among Hispanics #4 in a future blog. Sources: 1. “Hispanics View TV in Language Used at Home.” (2011, Apr. 20). Marketing Charts. Retrieved from http://www.marketingcharts.com/television/hispanics-view-tv-in-language-used-at-home-17130/ 4. De Lafuente, Della. (2008, Aug. 11). “Crossing Over: as Borders Blur and Cultural Mainstreaming Takes Over, Spanish-Language Ads Made in the U.S.can Increasingly Play in Latin America.” AdWeek. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.vapld.info/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA183043795&v=2.1&u=vapl_main&it=r&p=GRGM&sw=w   Cover Photo Source: LunaseeStudios /...

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