#2 – Do you speak my language?

We continue our blog on Five Reasons for Higher Ad Recall Among Hispanics. What do Budweiser, Bounty and McDonald’s have in common?  They have all successfully reached the Hispanic market with Spanish language print, radio and television ads. Spanish primetime advertisement spots reach over half the Hispanic population ages 18-49, while English ads only reach 40%.1 Deciding to advertise in a particular language involves more than simply translating copy. When done right, Spanish language ads produce 30% higher recall among Hispanics. Why? 2. Portrayal of Culture Most successful Spanish language ads involve an accurate portrayal of their culture. Sometimes advertisers have to find the common denominator of the culture to figure out what will best communicate to their targets. The Hispanic culture has an abundance of the four F’s: family, fun, futbol and fans. Finding ways to hit the four F’s and incorporating them into ads means connecting your brand with Hispanic cultural values, thereby giving your target market an ad that will surely resonate with them. Crown Imports incorporated the four F’s in a series of Spanish ads in 2008. Under the tagline, “Nuestro orgullo. Nuestra cerveza,” or “Our pride. Our beer,” Crown Imports was able to portray different facets of Hispanic culture from weddings (family) to dancing (fun) and from playing and/or watching soccer (futbol) sports to playing and/or watching other sports (fans). The Latino community praised the ad because of the cultural connections they felt.3 Stay tuned for Higher Ad Recall among Hispanics #3 in a future blog. Sources: 1. “Hispanics View TV in Language Used at Home.” (2011, Apr. 20). Marketing Charts. Retrieved from http://www.marketingcharts.com/television/hispanics-view-tv-in-language-used-at-home-17130/ 3. Beirne, Mike. (2008, June 20). “CoronaExtract Teps Latino Pride.” Ad Week. Retrieved from http://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.vapld.info/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA180564073&v=2.1&u=vapl_main&it=r&p=GRGM&sw=w Cover Photo Source: oneinchpunch /...

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#1 – Do you speak my language?

We begin our blog on 5 Reasons for Higher Ad Recall Among Hispanics. What do Budweiser, Bounty and McDonald’s have in common? They have all successfully reached the Hispanic market with Spanish language print, radio and television ads. Spanish primetime advertisement spots reach over half the Hispanic population ages 18-49, while English ads only reach 40%.1 Deciding to advertise in a particular language involves more than simply translating copy. When done right, Spanish language ads produce 30% higher recall among Hispanics. Why? 1. Mass appeal Imitation is said to be the highest form of flattery. For that reason, people tend to imitate and follow their favorite celebrities. Celebrity product and brand endorsements can also be a huge influence on consumer behavior. The Hispanic market, which is primarily young, mobile and thrives on entertainment, responds greatly to advertisements centered around their favorite celebrities. The only thing better than a celebrity endorsement is having that celebrity speak your target’s language, literally. Last year, Budweiser launched a large marketing campaign which included Spanish and English TV commercials, print, digital and retail advertisements centered around Hip-Hop sensation Pitbull. This famous Cuban-American not only resonates with the Hispanic community, but has enormous general market cross-over appeal, making the Bud Light campaign truly multicultural.2  Thus far, Pitbull’s celebrity endorsements have successfully extended out to other goods and products such as Dr. Pepper and Kodak cameras.2 “Marketers should think about Hispanic family values and lifestyles plus acculturation levels before creating multicultural campaigns,” according to George L. San Jose, president and chief creative officer of The San Jose Group. In all, launching a multicultural campaign takes much more than a couple of copywriters in a room with a translator (even though it doesn’t always look that way). Language is an essential component in any multicultural ad. If you want the Hispanic market to respond, hit them with an ad that speaks their language, speaks to their culture and isn’t the same, old mundane idea marketers have beat into the ground: yes, Hispanics are...

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Reader vs. Writer Survey Results – Part 2

As consumers continue to lead lives in the digital world, marketers must find places to meet them. One of those places is blogs. If you’re on the Internet, and certainly if you’re reading this, you’ve been exposed to blogs. More often than not, people seek out blogs for quick access information on the web. The San Jose Group (SJG) found in a recent San Jose Group interoffice survey that 94% of people read blogs multiple times a week, and 41% read blogs daily. Don’t be fooled, blogs come in several different shapes and sizes: standard text (like the one you’re reading now), microblogs (tweets), video (YouTube channels), Photo (flickr), Music (what MySpace is trying to become) and audio (Podcasts). In other words, much of what you might gain access to on the Internet is a blog. In the early days of blogging, each blog usually had only one author. But the World Wide Web has since then evolved and with it so has blogging. Today, multi-author blogs make up a large portion of blogs from those posted on corporate websites to universities to newspapers. While multi-author blogs are great in terms of getting to hear from different voices and opinions (this is America after all, we’re none too fond of propaganda here), readers realize they will not always know who is writing the content. Blogs provide an effective way for brands to market their products on the web. Therefore, blogs supply great rendezvous points for brands and consumers, whether the brand appears in the specific content or places ads around the blog. However, one blog will not reach and/or resonate with every demographic, and marketers must note some blog reader behaviors. For instance, teens have great spending power, but, as a population, they lack attention spans. So, aiming for teens on traditional blog platforms might not be as successful as targeting them on a microblog format (i.e. Facebook or Twitter). On the other hand, older audiences tend to use more traditional blogging platforms with...

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Latinos are the Biggest Spenders in Meat of America

Tony D’Andrea, PhD, Director of Planning and Research at SJG Whether shopping in supermarkets or socializing at traditional carnicería butchers, Hispanics have emerged as the highest spenders on fresh and frozen meat in America. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Latino households spend $964 on meat products each year, compared to $760 spent by general market households. Hispanics spent 27 percent more in beef, 21 percent in pork, and 48 percent in poultry. Dramatic differences are found in more specific categories, such as pork chops (34 percent), round steak (62 percent) and whole chicken (99 percent). An overview of the household spending in general meat categories can be seen in the table above. Differences in spending have remained at double-digit levels over the years with interesting lessons about the recession. Before the economic crisis, Hispanic households spent $890 in meat products against $763 by general market households – a 17 percent difference in 2007. Throughout the recession years, meat spending has increased slightly in the general market but more sharply among Hispanic households (see year 2008). As the economy seems to be slowly recovering, general market consumers resume going out to restaurants more regularly, whereas the domestic consumption of meats by Hispanics nears the thousand-dollar mark. At any point before, during or after the recession, the fact remains that Hispanics consistently spend more than the general market. This scenario will remain valid into the future, as the Hispanic demographic is projected to grow in population size and purchasing power: 51 million Latinos with a 1.3 trillion dollar wallet. The Latino Meat Consumer Hispanic meat consumption reflects general market patterns in an important aspect: meat consumption is largely determined by family size. Larger families consume more beef, whereas in smaller families (as well as in those with higher levels of education and average age) we see a gradual decline in beef and pork consumption, giving way to more poultry and ‘light’ versions of packaged meats. Given that Latino families are larger, younger and...

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Hispanics: Social Media Socialites

Remember your old MySpace friend, Tom? Well, even he’s ditched MySpace for bigger and better social networks. In a digital world full of social networks, only one stands as the social network of choice worldwide: Facebook. Eighty-one percent of American adults age 18 and up have Facebook accounts, and over half of them check/update their account daily.1 Twitter, the second most popular social network, is used by 62% of adults. Social networking influences several aspects of our lives including consumer behavior, so marketers must understand and utilize these trends to engage consumers and maximize market profitability. What makes Facebook a “Must”? Size matters—after all, the ability to connect with anybody relevant is the point of the “network.” The more users, the larger the network potential. Unlimited word count—while average Joes, to critics and even celebrities applaud Twitter’s micro blogging platform, sometimes it takes more than 140 characters to spit out everything you need to say; and since splitting up/continuing tweets can be a risky and annoying endeavor, people turn to Facebook, where concise is out and keeping their extraneous details is in. Photo share—yes, other social networks allow photo sharing, but none of them are as elaborate and popular as Facebook. Apps such as Pinterest and Instagram—games and other applications attract wide ranges of people to Facebook. These apps conviently share your pins, photos or even game scores on your timeline. Keeping in touch—while almost all social networks bring people together, none is more personal than Facebook. And when people want to stay updated with information from friends and family around the world, Facebook serves as a great way to connect. While Facebook dominates the social network preference, Hispanics rule total social network usage. Aside from Facebook, of which Hispanics are just one percentage point below the general market average, Hispanics over index on usage of every other social networking platform.1 This fact illustrates Hispanics are ahead of the game in terms of social networks. Additionally, they are open to testing out new networks....

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