Blogging Trends: The Individuals Perspective

As Facebook demonstrates, sometimes a picture is worth 1,000 words, but sometimes just one: anonymous Today, people are utilizing blogs at a rapid pace for several different facets: news, entertainment, education, business/career, social media and personal logs/daily diaries. But do readers really know who they are reading, and do writers really have a target? While these questions might seem irrelevant, the sociologist in me knows better. In order to truly understand why a person wrote what they wrote, what their motivational factors were and how their perception of society influenced their blogs, readers must know who the writers are (not to mention it helps verify a viable source). If I am reading a blog from 2000 written by a 20-year-old, liberal, upper-middle class, homosexual man, their perception of the world is going to be different than a blog written yesterday by a 50-year-old, conservative, upper class, heterosexual woman. In order to contextualize some things, we really have to understand who our writers are. Trying to decipher gender, ethnicity and age from a writer’s name and blog content can only get readers so far—but most times, that’s all you are going to get. Why does it matter? The Internet is one place where people feel like they can find their perfect matches: significant others, friends and, yes, even bloggers. When matching my interests and preferences to a blog, and certainly before I subscribe to a blog, I must have a good indication that this blogger will post information relevant to my interests. The same goes for company blogs; if their blogs don’t interest me or drive engagement, I’m not likely to become a reader or subscriber. As far as targeting blog readers, writers have to have some sort of “aim.” No one can write something, pleasing and relevant to everybody in the world, especially on the Internet where people typically do not feel inclined to withhold negative feedback. Marketing is all about aim. Advertisers cannot simply place an ad and say: “this will get everybody’s...

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The Revolution of Social Media

By Nicole Hernandez, social media specialist, at The San Jose Group “We don’t have a choice on whether we DO social media, the question is how well we DO it.” – Erik Qualman According to Edison Research, last year, 68% of Americans using social networks said that none of those networks had influence on their buying decisions. This year, only 36% said that there was no influence. In just one year, the influence that social networks have had on consumers has changed drastically and it is evident that social media should serve as an essential platform for marketers – in fact, 93% of marketers use social media for business. People will always talk about your brand so it’s important to take note and listen to what they are saying. Just think, since 90% of consumers trust peer recommendations, it is vital for marketers to become a part of that influence. Being aware of which social platforms consumers are using to discuss your brand is a key factor in determining where you should be listening and engaging in dialogue. Take two minutes to watch the phenomenal video about social media below; we assure you won’t regret it. Now, if you’re still not using social media for marketing purposes, what are you waiting for? Become part of the revolution today. Sources: Socialnomics:...

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Trending: Tablets in Today’s Mobile World

As one of the most mobile consumers in the United States, Hispanics display enormous mobile spending power. According to the “2012 Hispanic Mobile Consumer Survey,” by Zpryme Research and Consulting, Hispanics are projected to spend $17.6 billion on mobile tech devices this year.1 We are all marching toward the day when we will literally have our lives on one mobile device: a smartphone/tablet/laptop. Samsung and AT&T have already made great strides toward this device as they have launched a marketing campaign for the new Galaxy Note Tablet/Smartphone earlier this year. The campaign advertises the Galaxy Note as “Smartphone? Tablet? It’s the best of both” (2012 Samsung Galaxy Note). Apple is currently planning to release a smaller iPad to compete with other tablet manufacturers such as Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Inc. and Google.2 Since the iPad hit stores in April, 2010, tablets have settled in as the latest trend in the mobile world. To keep up, smartphones are getting bigger (and are being marketed as tablets). And Laptops, besides being made smaller and lighter, are getting cheaper. Tablet competition has made huge impacts in the technology market. Before the iPad launched, netbooks stood alone as the inexpensive, conveniently mobile and Wi-Fi accessible devices. But since tablets came around, netbooks have become almost obsolete. Making computers smaller is not enough to keep consumers spending their technology dollars on laptops, so laptop manufacturers are reducing their prices in order to compete with the low prices of tablets. Why should marketers watch Hispanic Mobile Spending? A mobile investment is a gateway to the Internet and that means more spending. Almost 70% of Hispanic consumers own laptops, over half own smart phones, and almost 20% own tablets according to Zpryme. While the Hispanic population already stands as an extremely digitally savvy one, the study showed in the next six months, nearly a quarter of Hispanics will invest in a new smartphone, 21% in a new laptop and 18% in a tablet. Hispanics, through several mobile devices, use the Internet to make...

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Hispanic Travel: The Anti-Get Away Experience

Map based on data from: Jainchill, Johanna. (2012, June 19). “Reports highlight travel habits of Hispanics, African-Americans.”Jensen-Campbell, Cam (2005, Apr. 27). “Today’s Hispanic Consumer.”NTA Convention ’10 Montreal, Quebec. (2010 Nov. 13). “Understanding the Hispanic Travel Market.” As we enter the summer months, marketers should have travel on the mind. Why, because kids are out of school, the weather is nice, and we’ve finally worked off that holiday weight? No, it’s because this is the time of the year the majority of U.S. Hispanics prefer to travel. According to this year’s RedMas “De Vacaciones US Hispanic Vacation Travel Trends” survey, at least 57% of Hispanics travel at least once a year, and over 75% of the population has traveled in the past.1 The travel industry is incredibly enormous. In recent years, the U.S. airline industry exceeded $172 billion in revenue.2 Hispanics segmented the largest minority role (over $42 billion) in that spending. 3 Though a popular way to travel, airlines are not the only mode of transportation. Hispanics spend travel dollars on buses, railroads, and car rentals not to mention on hotels and recreation. In order to tap into the travel spending, marketers have to understand the Hispanic culture in terms of travel. Who: This one’s a no-brainer, Hispanics. The more important question with Hispanics is “Who with?” On average, Hispanics travel with three other people (exceeding the general market average) — typically bringing close and/or extended family, but they also travel with friends.4 What: In addition to visiting family, Hispanics are traveling to destinations in the United States and abroad through various modes of transportation and spending money on various activities including entertainment (movies), recreational sports (riding bikes), sporting events (NASCAR), and visiting theme parks (Disney World). Since Hispanics usually travel with friends and family who are a variety of ages, they select from a wide range of activities in order to satisfy everyone’s vacation needs. When: Hispanics prefer to getaway during the summer months; however, winter, specifically Christmas break, draws an enormous amount...

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How to Determine Facebook and Twitter ROI

By Nicole Hernandez, social media specialist, at The San Jose Group How do marketers determine their return on investment (ROI)? The following statement makes it difficult for marketers to prove their worth to CEOs. 73% of CEOs think marketers lack business credibility and are not the business growth generators they should be, while 77% of CEOs think marketers don’t talk about what really matters: sales. In order to answer the above question, every company or brand needs to set a few ground rules before jumping into how they will measure their ROI for social media. Here are two essential rules to consider: Goals should be made so that the vision of how Facebook and Twitter will be used is clear. Objectives should be established so that there is a measurable result. How will your brand use social media? Check out the following social media success from the InventHelp infographic...

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