Mobile Use Among Hispanics Escalating Compared to the Total Population & How it Impacts Marketers

Whether you’re at home, at work or anywhere in between, your mobile phone allows you to stay connected with everyone around you.  You can surf the web, play games like Angry Birds, check into destinations via Foursquare, read restaurant reviews and make reservations through Yelp and OpenTable, take pictures and post them on Facebook and Twitter, and download music and coupons all from the palm of your hand.  These devices can do everything your home computer can do, and cost less than half the price.  Mobile usage continues to climb among all groups; however, the group that is leading the charge is the Hispanic population.  According to Scarborough Research, mobile usage among Hispanics is escalating at a faster rate than it is among the total population.  Mobile marketing to the Hispanic population allows one to reach a massive audience that is only getting bigger when they are using a device that is not only fun, but is with them at all times. Currently, 82% of Hispanic adults use a mobile phone, while almost 11% of Hispanic children between the ages of 13-17 are using mobile devices.  The Pew Hispanic Center’s 2010 National Survey of Latinos discovered that 49% of 16-17 year olds say they send text messages from their mobile phones every day, but it doesn’t stop there.  Hispanics text, download music, play games, and use social networking from their phones more than the total population of all mobile phone users.  What is driving these massive numbers and what is driving Hispanics to their phones at this rate?  One reason is the ability of social networking; Hispanics see this as a way to connect with friends and family both locally and globally.  Being able to call, text, message, video chat or tweet with anyone at anytime is a huge appeal to Hispanic mobile phone users.  Next is innovation.  By the time you are done reading this sentence a new and better version of your phone has just hit the market and can do just...

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Packaged Meats among Hispanics: Complex Tastes and Consumption Patterns among the Highest Spenders in America

By Tony D’Andrea, PhD, Director of Planning and Research at SJG Whether shopping at modern supermarkets or socializing at traditional carnicería butchers, Hispanics have emerged as the highest spenders of meat products in America.  According to the most recent data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Latino households spend $955 dollars each year on meat products, comparatively to $826 by general market households. In some ways, Hispanics reflect general market trends, with family size as the main driver of meat consumption in America. Larger families tend to consume more beef, whereas smaller families, higher education and higher age see a gradual decline in beef and pork, giving way to poultry and ‘light’ versions of packaged meats. Beyond such basic generalizations, Latinos do differ in significant ways in meat purchase and consumption. Unlike Whites and African Americans, meat consumption among Latinos remains largely uniform across the income gamut. Both high- and low-income Hispanics buy meats in larger quantities, as indicated in the 150+ index for Hispanics in the highest weight purchase range (8+ pounds of cold cuts per week) according to a Packaged Facts report. Also importantly, Hispanics are more price-sensitive, and, regardless of income level, they seek good-value deals, and also substitute closely related meat products as a reaction to price change. Tastes and preferences in packaged meats among Hispanics also differ from the general market in significant ways. Latinos are heavy consumers of chicken sausages and frankfurters, as noted in a whopping 250+ index detected by market monitors and academic studies alike. Also high are beef sausages, spicy meats, and arc/rope-shape sausages, all indexing in the 150-180 preference range. Conversely, links, patties, kielbasas, as well as uncooked meats and ‘light’ delis, are not as highly consumed by Hispanics, as indicated by the mere 60-70 range in preference index. Hovering around 100 index points, processed pork, particularly bacon, provide interesting marketing opportunities. Historically valued across Latin and Iberian cultures, pork-based products gain the special favor of Hispanics when marketed at distinctive branding and...

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Integrating Entertainment and Education among Hispanics: Museums as a Case of Multicultural Marketing

By Tony D’Andrea, PhD, Director of Research and Planning at SJG As the summer is in full-swing, families enjoy more outdoor activities. Among a variety of options, museums “from A to Z” (arts, aquariums, natural, thematic, zoos, etc.) provide a very special case, as it speaks to leisure, education and tourism industries altogether. From archives of cultural artifacts, they have been refashioned as spaces of discovery in multimedia settings. Moreover, they are invaluable assets in the strategies of leading cities and socially responsible corporations seeking to connect with professional elites and local communities. Yet, as a category, museums are often marked by a strange paradox: high interest and low usage by the population.   Museums from A to Z are generally considered to be a very good value entertainment. They occupy the top-tier of attractions in any list mentioned in industry research reports. The basic perception is that your family can learn and have fun at the same time. This also holds true in the opinion of Hispanics. Curiously, the highest levels of interest in museums are to be found at the opposite ends of the Hispanic acculturation spectrum. Affluent “new Latinos” attend museums as part of a polished lifestyle, whereas immigrants seek opportunities to learn about their new homelands while also complementing their children’s education. As noted by Jim Legg, San Jose Group’s EVP of Leadership and Innovation, “this is about enjoying one of the noblest expressions of the American Dream. And it also shows how entertainment and education may come together in this growing segment of the U.S. population.” However, museum attendance has been declining since the early 1990s. As measured by the U.S. National Endowment for the Arts, 22.7% of the U.S. population visited a museum in 2008, down from 26.7% in 1992. The decline is also seen among ethnic minorities. Although comprising 16% of the U.S. population, Hispanics make up 9% of museum visitors. Likewise, African Americans comprise 11% of the population but only 6% of the audience. (Interestingly, museum...

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