There’s Nothing More Fun Than Pitching Latino Media – PART 2

Q&A with Angelica Martinez, senior account executive at The San Jose Group (former editor, radio host, producer, T.V. news coordinator) 1. What is the first thing that a PR practitioner should do when beginning to work with Latino media? Create a friendly, non-working relationship. Forget about the typical and formal messages, and the pitch emails you usually send for general market media. Don’t you want to have a new good friend? Everybody does! So be natural, honest and genuine. Tell them why your materials are good for their audience. If they said “no” at the beginning, do not worry, eventually they will say “yes” to you if you’ve established that friendly relationship. 2. What type of stories is Latino media most receptive to publishing? They do not have a lot of reporters to cover local stories, so you can take advantage of this. If you have a national story just customize your press releases with that city’s name in the lead of the release. For example, if your client is headquartered in Chicago, but you’re pitching multiple media markets around the country, change the release for each market to list the appropriate city’s name. The content of the release does not change, but because it is customized, the likelihood of the paper using it is greater. Also, try to pitch Latino stories based in their NEEDS and CULTURE. It sounds funny but it is true. I can’t imagine myself pitching a story about how to travel to China for vacation. How many Latinos can do that? Remember always to create a connection between your press release and a direct benefit for the Hispanic community. 3. Are there certain days/times that are best to pitch? For weekly newspapers, my suggestion is to pitch on Monday or Tuesday. Friday is not a good day because editors are usually relaxing after a stressful week. Avoid calling them the day before the paper is published (i.e. if the paper goes out on Friday, do not pitch on Thursday)....

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Addressable Media & The Holy Grail of Multicultural Marketers

By Jim Legg, Executive Vice President of Leadership and Integration “For years, the Holy Grail of TV’s future has been for cable TV systems to achieve Internet-like interactivity with their subscribers. In fact, the possibility of addressable TV advertising has been talked about for so long that it has taken on urban myth-like status for many cynics,” Antonio Neves, Ad Age. An urban myth no longer, addressable media is more of a reality today and is gaining ground to become a vital part of the future of advertising. The extent of consumer profiling that can be conducted is yet to be determined by the U.S. government, and will dictate the future of addressable media. However, marketers see its value and are not slowing down. With the right marketing model and addressable media, traditional TV’s impact and reach with new technologies and marketing solutions can better connect brands with consumers. Canoe Ventures, a technology consortium of the country’s six largest cable companies, allows brands the capability to specifically target consumers with certain creative or nuanced messaging, based on the consortium’s cable zone technology overlaid with Experian data. For example, a credit card company can run a spot nationally for one of its standard credit cards. For the cable zones that have higher incomes, based on the Experian data, the brand can run nuanced creative for a higher-end card that will resonate better with that audience. Ultimately, the infrastructure and intelligence helps match more relevant marketing messages with audiences. The U.S. Census data continues to reveal how the multicultural U.S. population continues to evolve. Understanding this, the power of addressable media is amplified as it can provide marketers a way to target consumers with the most appropriate and culturally relevant message. “Like the credit card example given, sooner rather than later addressable media will allow advertising to specifically target by ethnicity and language preference. Marketers should consider an agency partner that understands the evolving U.S. landscape, has a model that addresses it, and is proficient in...

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Fact & Trend Report: Markets

Multicultural Metropolis Many cities have a Chinatown, some boast a Ukrainian Village and others may have a Greektown or Little Italy. Metropolitan areas still have segmentation to a certain extent, but the blend continues as the multicultural populations grow at a robust pace in these major markets. And not only are these segments getting bigger, they are also getting younger. According to the U.S. Census, the multicultural market is larger, or at parity with, the general market within the Top-20 largest metropolitan areas when looking into various coveted age demos. For those under 18 years of age, 57% of the market is multicultural, for 18 – 34 years olds 53% are multicultural, 18 – 44 year olds 52% are multicultural, and among 18 – 54 year olds 49% of the market are multicultural. The Hispanic segment is experiencing the most growth, considering they already represent 25% of the traditional target demo of adults 18-44 in the Top-20 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. In markets like L.A. and Miami, Hispanic population represents nearly half of the population within the age group. The San Jose Group, an integrated multicultural marketing communications agency, suggests that brands from coast to coast who choose to ignore the multicultural segment is stifling their own growth. These markets include New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Phoenix, Philadelphia, San Antonio, San Diego, Dallas, San Jose, Detroit, San Francisco, Jacksonville, Indianapolis, Austin, Columbus, Fort Worth, Charlotte, Memphis and Boston. It is imperative for marketers to know that these areas are already major hubs for potential multicultural brand evangelists and advocates, and it is just the beginning of the boom. For more information about the San Jose Group please visit...

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