Pew Hispanic Center Releases Updated Statistical Profiles of U.S. Hispanics

The Pew Hispanic Center has just released updated profiles of the Hispanic population based on data from the Census Bureau’s 2008 American Community Survey (ACS). The new report touches on two especially timely topics: racial self-identification and health insurance coverage. The Race Question The question about race on the 2008 ACS contained the same wording as that found on the 2010 Census, so it’s an interesting indicator of the response this year’s survey might receive. There were two questions on the ACS form, both preceded by this explanation: NOTE: Please answer BOTH Question 5 about Hispanic origin and Question 6 about race. For this survey, Hispanic origins are not races. The first question asked for Hispanic origin, and the second for race, with Hispanic not an option. On the 2008 ACS survey, 62.5% of Hispanics answered they are white only. Only 1.9% self-identified themselves as black only. However, 30.4% identify themselves as “some other race,” a response rarely selected by the non-Hispanic population. While the percentage of Hispanics answering “some other race” has decreased from recent years, nearly a third of the population is still a sizable portion. The Pew Center conducted its own surveys of Latinos in 2009 and received the following response to the race question: 26% white, 8% black or other, 28% some other race and 37% Hispanic/Latino (volunteered this identification). Personally, I’ve already seen this topic come up several times in the past month, from Facebook wall posts by friends to media coverage and blog posts. It will be interesting to see the responses to the 2010 Census, especially with the increased attention on the issue and terminology this year. Health Insurance Coverage For the first time, the 2008 ACS included a question about health insurance coverage, and found that Hispanics are the least likely to have health insurance among racial and ethnic...

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Stronger Wireless Internet Networks Could Boost Online Hispanic Numbers

As the CTIA Wireless convention continues in Las Vegas, wireless providers are buzzing about the potential for profit behind wireless Internet. Last year, consumers spent $41 billion on wireless Internet, up 28% from 2008. Several carriers are now investing in faster networks and phone models with increased online capabilities. It will be interesting to see how this evolution of wireless services affects the Hispanic market. We already know that Hispanics who access the Internet are likely to use their cell phone: 32% of online Hispanics use their mobile phone to access the Internet vs. 20% of the general market (according to AOL’s Hispanic Cyberstudy). Since this tendency is already in place, the greater availability of reliable wireless Internet service could help boost the number of Hispanics online even...

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Hispanic Journalists on Twitter

As a follow-up to my previous post about Spanish media using social media, I thought I’d start a “Hispanic journalists on Twitter” list. There are plenty of these for the general market but I haven’t seen one for the Hispanic market. Here is the start of my list and I’ll try to update this over time. Feel free to add any others in the comments section! Jorge Ramos – anchor, Noticiero Univision (also an author and journalist) Raul de Molina – host, El Gordo y La Flaca, Univision Barbara Bermudo – host, Primer Impacto, Univision Ilia Calderon – anchor, Primer Impacto, Univision Tony Dandrades – reporter, Primer Impacto, Univision Satcha Pretto – anchor, Primer Impacto, Univision Maria Elena Salinas – co-anchor, Univision Network News Lourdes Stephen – correspondent, Primer Impacto, Univision Solangelee – senior executive producer, Primer Impacto, Univision Enrique Gutierrez – sports anchor, Univision Los Angeles Enrique Santos – host, morning show on Univision Radio 98.3 FM Miami Azucena Cierco – entertainment reporter, Al Rojo Vivo, Telemundo Jorge Bernal – entertainment anchor, Al Rojo Vivo, Telemundo Maria Celeste – host, Al Rojo Vivo, Telemundo (also a bestselling author) Kamel Perez Mon – Telemundo producer & director Carines Moncada – reporter, Telemundo Miami Alejandro Navarro – sports anchor/reporter, Telemundo Los Angeles Ubaldo Martinez – sports director/producer, Telemundo Oklahoma City Pilar Marrero – journalist, columnist & blogger, La Opinion Jorge Cabrales aka El Pichirilo – radio personality, La Raza 93.7 FM, Dallas Vicente de la Cruz – editor, La Raza Areli Padilla – entertainment editor, La Raza Ivan Colon – gaming & technology reporter for several outlets Soraya Alcala – editor, Columna Estilos Gisela Orozco – entertainment editor,...

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Spanish Networks Experimenting with Social Media in Different Ways

According to a recent article, anchors and reporters from the Spanish networks are flocking to social media, setting up Twitter accounts and Facebook fan pages. From Univision, Telemundo and Azteca America to local affiliate stations, various Hispanic media entities are experimenting with social media. The most common way media are breaking into these online channels has popular anchors and personalities setting up an extension of their brand online, such as Univision’s Jorge Ramos tweeting about the stories he’s covering. (Speaking of Twitter, it seems that Comscore has named it one of the top 5 social media sites among U.S. Hispanics. And Facebook has surpassed MySpace to become #1 among U.S. Hispanics.) Taking a look at how different media properties are using social media, I think it’s interesting to look at Univision vs. Telemundo. According to the article, Telemundo has set up 17 accounts on various platforms to aggregate more than 180,000 followers. This includes several Twitter accounts (for news, novelas, other shows, etc.), a Facebook presence and video blogs. Univision has taken a bit of a different approach, focusing on a more lifestyle-driven presence on Facebook, attempting to unite fans under their love for the Spanish language. It’s similar to the Being Latino page, which seeks to bring together the Latino community on Facebook under a larger umbrella. Certain Latino news personalities have already been finding success through social media in the general market. CNN’s Soledad O’Brien, an active Tweeter, has been building up her fan base and in the past couple year or so has developed high profile programs like Latino in America, and secured speaking engagements with the NCLR and the upcoming NGLC conference. I can’t necessarily say if there’s a cause-effect relationship here, but it seems that having immediate and personal access to Soledad has helped build and strengthen her fan base, leading to great exposure for her personal brand and what she’s doing on CNN. Personally, I’m excited to see this increased interaction among the Hispanic news community online for three main reasons:...

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